Early hikes of the season

The spring is off to a slow, cold start, but we’ve still managed to make it to local trails for a couple of days these past few weeks. Our first adventure was a walk in Tower Rock State Park. When the Lewis and Clark Expedition came though the area, Capt. Lewis climbed this area to gain a better understanding of where the plains end and the mountains begin. 

It’s a steep walk up to the saddle below the actual Tower Rock, but there are lots of neat areas to see and explore. We had significant mud, and a lot more snow, than I anticipated, but it was a good day to be outside. There was even a bonus sighting of the bighorn sheep band that frequents the area. 

This region along the Missouri River is particularly stunning in the late spring when the yucca are blooming, but even in the barren early part of the season, the geology of the region is remarkable. This particular rocky outcropping always caught my eye, so I was fascinated to learn that it was caused by a pyroclastic flow from a volcano southeast of Tower Rock and interstate 15, according to a geologist friend of mine who is always so good about answering my bazillion questions about such things. It’s hard to imagine volcanic activity like that, yet the rocks make total sense of it. The day ended with multiple pairs of muddy boots.  The good news is there were no snakes and no ticks (both significant considerations when the weather warms), and an enjoyable time exploring the beautiful area not far from Great Falls.

Last week we ventured to the First Peoples’ Buffalo Jump in Ulm. Normally, at this time of the year, the trail would be clear of snow, yet this season we had to trek over several smaller snow fields. 

Besides the increasing number of waterfowl we spotted in flooded fields along the way, we spotted a couple of marmots in the rocks along the trail.

Once again, this wasn’t an epic hike, but it was a nice way to spend a pleasant day. No bugs, no snakes, just breaking in the legs and enjoying the sunshine.

Adventures in the cold

The cold that hurts is on its way. After a few days of relatively warm temperatures, meaning above 20 degrees F., it appears the deep freeze is on tap for the New Year.  

Cold is not a new concept. Growing up in northeastern Ohio, it was common for me to play outside so long that my feet hurt to the point I had to go back inside to soak them in the tub before pulling my boots back on and heading out again. And, although typical winters didn’t amount to much, we tried to make the most of them. One year I fashioned snowshoes out of grapevine and yarn, and couldn’t wait until we had enough snow to try them out. Finally, drifts along the fence allowed me to tromp along learning the obvious flaws of my design and choice of materials. They made it a couple of hundred yards before disintegrating, but I was still enthralled with the closest thing I’ve ever experienced to walking on water.

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Since moving to Montana 27 years ago, I learned about real winters. In Coram, the snow was so deep some years it required a front end loader to open up the drive going up to the greenhouse… in April. And I never knew Fahrenheit and Celsius evened up at -40 degrees until I saw it first hand. You could feel the cold coming through the walls that night. With months of weather that can kill you, you learn to adapt.

It’s all about the gear. With the right clothes anything is possible. When gathering ambient sound during a bighorn sheep rut during the filming of Giants of Jasper, it was -30 F, and at first I couldn’t believe we were actually going to film in those conditions. Yet, sheep don’t wait when Cupid reigns. Unfortunately, equipment does not like temperatures in that realm so it was a constant struggle keeping the DAT (digital audio tape at that time) running. As I sat there among the sheep, who milled around us like we weren’t even there, I coaxed the recorder to continue running by shoving it deep within the -20 F L.L. Bean parka, doing my best not to breathe and staying as still as absolutely possible. I also had to continually replace the chemical hand heaters since they don’t stay warm for long in those conditions. It was worth it, though, and was an unforgettable experience.

When I searched National Geographic for Giants of Jasper, I ran across these clips of some of the footage. It’s fun to see some of them once again.

This ram, in particular, was an impressive big boy:

Over the years, I’ve refined what works best for the given situation. It’s a balance between warmth and mobility, oftentimes with warmth winning, but newer materials make life a whole lot easier. I still have that -20 parka, but wear it only when it’s absolutely brutal, which hasn’t happened in years. So far this season, our coldest has been -23 F, but it’s nothing the 700 fill Marmot down jacket can’t handle, at least for short periods of time. When I’m heading to the barn during cold snaps like this, it’s typical to wear my Marmot snow pants (obviously I’m a fan of the brand), sometimes with Under Armor running tights, or truthfully, my fleece jammy bottoms because the one positive thing about the bitter cold is no one can tell underneath the snow pants! But that’s only for a trip to the barn.  On top, I wear a thermal top, fleece, down vest, and the Marmot jacket along with a hat and mittens, my preference over gloves when it becomes really cold.

Boots are another serious consideration during this type of weather.  I must admit, I’m very impressed by how warm the Muck boots keep your feet. As long as I’m moving, whether it’s walking or cleaning the stalls, my feet stay fairly comfortable. I also love my Sorels made by Kaufman and Co. in Canada that I purchased probably 25 years ago. I’m sure I found them in Banff one year, but I’m so disappointed they don’t make them anymore. My other heavy duty winter boot is a White’s pack boot meant for riding. The greatest drawback with this one is it takes a long time to lace it up versus just slipping it on and going out. As for socks, I go with wool. I adore my Arctic Alpaca  socks from Alpacas of Montana, but since I wear heavy socks practically every day, I have an assortment of different brands. As long as they’re wool, I’m happy.

It’s been good to have a break in the weather in between cold spells to give us a chance to clean up. The chicken coop needed changed out, as well as the cat box in the garage. It also gave us all a chance to throw our cold weather gear in the wash to prepare for this next bitter round. Ready or not, here it comes.