Now we’re cooking with solar

Over a week ago the Solavore Sport arrived, just in time for a much needed moisture dumping snowstorm. So it sat in the box while I plowed through other assignments and waited for the sun and warm weather to return.  Although we had much nicer days earlier in the week with totally blue bird skies, yesterday was my day to give it a try since another round of rain is on its way. I was a bit dubious whether I was going to be able to do anything when I woke to unexpected cloud cover, but by noon the skies looked more promising so I set it on the picnic table to see if it would heat up enough to give cookies a try.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When I cook, I’m often a, “Turn it on high and say goodbye. When it’s black, c’mon back!” type of chef. I’m always in a rush (which is why the pressure cooker is one of my all time favorite kitchen appliances). Solar ovens are more along the lines of a slow cooker using the sun instead of plugging it in. Once the temperature is over 180 degrees F. you can use it, although if it drops below 150 degrees F. you’re asking for trouble since the lower temperatures can allow bacteria to proliferate. But since we’re not dealing with 350 degrees or more, it’s important to realize that it’s going to take more time. With the clouds and periodic sun, the oven reached just over 200 degrees yesterday, although there was a fair amount of time when it hovered around 175 degrees.  I thought there was no way those cookies were going to bake at all, but I wanted to give it a try.

Cookies in the solar oven
Cookies in the solar oven

We just made the regular chocolate chip recipe, and spooned a dozen in a parched line pan that was small enough to fit in the oven. It took a couple of hours to bake, but they were incredibly hot and yummy! I can totally see pulling out a batch of these while hunkering around the campfire sometime this summer. Talk about a terrific camping experience.

My little experiment opened up a world of possibilities for me in the outdoor cooking realm. When our fire danger is off the charts, what can be a safer way to cook? I can absolutely see bringing this with us to camp, putting a meal in there, and then heading off to hike or fish. You don’t have to fuss and worry about foods burning.

I’m also going to use it this summer when the temps crack the mid-80s, and Grant is grousing at me every time I start the oven since it heats up the house. Since we don’t have air conditioning, it does tend to feel like a sauna in here at times. (And if you do have air conditioning, I would think this could help reduce how hard it’ll have to work.) Although I won’t be able to bake my weekly 3 loaves of Kamut Khorasan wheat bread in it, I can easily put together dinner a head of time, and set it in there to cook for hours. I think my next project will be barbecued ribs, although from what I’m reading, the options are practically limitless.

It’s going to be a lot of fun to play with the Solavore Sport, not only at home, but when we go camping. I see why they are so important in areas of the world where fuel is scarce, and I can understand how they can help us reduce our energy usage, as well.

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