Homemade ravioli

Special moments are created in the kitchen. For weeks, Sam’s wanted to learn how to make ravioli since he knew it was a tradition with Grandma Elsie’s family. We tried a batch at home, but used too many eggs making the dough sticky and uncooperative. Sam called them “crumples” because the ones that didn’t fall apart were badly misshapen. It was time to call in the expert.

 

Last week we were able to go over to Grandma Elsie’s for her to show us the proper way to make them. Her parents are both from Italy and her mom made hundreds of ravioli each fall to eat throughout the year. This is their typical fare for holidays, plus they’re ideal to have in the freezer for a fast meal, which is a necessary when returning home from Taekwondo in the evenings.

She’d already made a substantial batch, so the pasta machine, ravioli mold, and the work surface was out and ready to go. Sam was first up with the pasta dough.  Using 1 cup flour, 1 egg, salt, and a little chicken broth she showed him how to make the dough that was elastic and smooth without sticking to everything or falling apart. He quickly got the hang of it.

 

Our friend, Darci, is the rolling pro so she showed them how to roll each half of the dough multiple times, adding flour as necessary, until it was rolled through the number 5 setting to create a perfectly sized sheet for the mold.

Prior to our get-together for the ravioli making, I cooked a couple of small pork and beef roasts, and after chilling them in the fridge, chopped them up with the food processor (I do need to chop it finer the next time). Then I added bread crumbs, 3 eggs, salt, and dried basil, oregano and thyme. Once the sheet of dough is placed on the mold and pressed to indent each one, they are filled with a dollop of the meat mixture.

Another sheet is placed over the top, pressed down, and a rolling pin is used to firmly seal the dough. It takes a lot of pressure, but John vigorously tackled the task. They came out perfectly.

We made 8 dozen during our initial lesson, and Sam was so excited about his newfound talent, that we made 6 dozen more then next day at home with both a meat mixture and one using ricotta, parmesan, mozzarella, and herbs. We still have finessing to master to be as good as Grandma Elsie, but after a few hundred more we might be close.

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