Early hikes of the season

The spring is off to a slow, cold start, but we’ve still managed to make it to local trails for a couple of days these past few weeks. Our first adventure was a walk in Tower Rock State Park. When the Lewis and Clark Expedition came though the area, Capt. Lewis climbed this area to gain a better understanding of where the plains end and the mountains begin. 

It’s a steep walk up to the saddle below the actual Tower Rock, but there are lots of neat areas to see and explore. We had significant mud, and a lot more snow, than I anticipated, but it was a good day to be outside. There was even a bonus sighting of the bighorn sheep band that frequents the area. 

This region along the Missouri River is particularly stunning in the late spring when the yucca are blooming, but even in the barren early part of the season, the geology of the region is remarkable. This particular rocky outcropping always caught my eye, so I was fascinated to learn that it was caused by a pyroclastic flow from a volcano southeast of Tower Rock and interstate 15, according to a geologist friend of mine who is always so good about answering my bazillion questions about such things. It’s hard to imagine volcanic activity like that, yet the rocks make total sense of it. The day ended with multiple pairs of muddy boots.  The good news is there were no snakes and no ticks (both significant considerations when the weather warms), and an enjoyable time exploring the beautiful area not far from Great Falls.

Last week we ventured to the First Peoples’ Buffalo Jump in Ulm. Normally, at this time of the year, the trail would be clear of snow, yet this season we had to trek over several smaller snow fields. 

Besides the increasing number of waterfowl we spotted in flooded fields along the way, we spotted a couple of marmots in the rocks along the trail.

Once again, this wasn’t an epic hike, but it was a nice way to spend a pleasant day. No bugs, no snakes, just breaking in the legs and enjoying the sunshine.

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