Staying at Granite Park Chalet with food allergies

Last January, 4 of us were on the computer vying for a night at Granite Park Chalet as soon as the reservation system opened. With the burning of Sperry Chalet in August 2017, we thought the competition for a night at Granite Park would be greater, so we were thrilled when a couple of us managed to send in a reservation request. We were ultimately granted the time for July 14, a date we figured was late enough to be mostly free of snow, while still early for fires.

As soon as our date was set, the planning and excitement began, but as the time drew closer, my level of concern also exponentially increased. Granite Park Chalet is a little bit of heaven being able to stay in a historic – and incredibly well-built stone structure (I kind of geek out over these things)- in one of the prettiest places on earth, but when food can kill you, you look at things differently, particularly when there is no easy way to receive help. 

In our case, I don’t have a food allergy, but my son, Sam, does. And nuts, including all of those delicious, high-protein additives to trail foods, are the most dangerous. We avoid foods from facilities that process tree nuts or peanuts even in our ingredients (because everything from a frozen turkey to regular milk can be cross-contaminated) so staying at a place where people are constantly snacking on these foods – and touching the tables, chairs, doorhandles, or sleeping with their peanut butter smeared faces on the pillows – sent me into high alert. For weeks ahead of time, I woke up in the middle of the night going over every possible scenario. How can I keep him from accidental contact? What happens if he does have a reaction?

Granite Park Chalet is a 7.2 mile hike in from Logan Pass in Glacier National Park, or a 4 mile (and 2400 ft. elevation gain) hoof up from what’s called The Loop, a sharp curve on the west side of Going-to-the-Sun Rd. There is cell service from the chalet, and there is often a ranger on duty who can call in in case of an emergency, but that doesn’t mean anybody can reach you in time. Weather or logistics can ground a helicopter, and hiking either of the trails at night is sketchy because of grizzlies, as well as just being a long way out in an emergency situation. Even bringing 6 epi-pens, I envisioned backpacking my 75 lbs. child down the trail to The Loop, wondering how fast I could feasibly do it if he had a reaction and a helicopter wasn’t an option. These are the things that tap you on the shoulder at 3 a.m. so I intended to do everything possible not to have to deal with any of the worst case scenarios that ran through my mind.

As I mentioned, I had 6 epi-pens, plus Benadryl, but the trick was to keep the epinephrin within the acceptable storage range of 66-77 degrees F., which is a challenging when it can go from nearly freezing to 80 degrees in the course of a day. And that’s exactly what the weather did. On our hike into the chalet, the clouds hung low and it occasionally spit snow. Most of us had on winter jackets, hats, and gloves. I had the epis in pockets, as well as insulated as best as I could inside of my and Sam’s packs. (I always had a pair in his pack in case he had a reaction so I could just grab them without taking off mine.) At night, I slept with them like a clunky teddy bear to keep them relatively warm. The next day, I had to keep them next to the cooler water bladders and inside the Frio insulating pack because the temperature rose well into the upper 70s – and we opted for shorts –  on our hike out. 

As any food allergy mom knows, baby wipes are our best friends. Hand sanitizer does not eliminate food proteins so wiping off tables or anything else with it doesn’t help. Baby wipes do. My friend, Julie, was proactive and brought them, as well, and wiped down everything in our cabin at the St. Mary KOA the night before we hit the trail. From the door handles to the rungs of the ladders on the bunks, that girl had the cabin clean. When we were at Granite Park, I was careful to wipe off the table and anywhere Sam might touch. Of course, I got “the look” since an 11 year old, especially when he’s with two 11 year old friends, doesn’t necessarily want Mom fussing like a loon. But a loon I will be. I even brought a separate set of sheets to put over the ones they provided to be sure that there was extra protection between him and what a previous guest might have eaten. 

Surprisingly, the food wasn’t as big of an issue as some might think. Of course, this is what we live every day. We do need to try Mountain House freeze dried meals, as I’ve heard from a number in the food allergy circles that they are good about labeling and there’s no risk of cross-contamination, but I wanted to stick with known quantities for this trip. The crew at the chalet is always phenomenal, but they were particularly accommodating when I mentioned that Sam had food allergies so I hoped to keep everything separate. They did whatever I needed, which wasn’t much, but just having them be so willing was a huge relief. I packed our own cookware, including the pans to heat up the water, even though there is a fantastic kitchen with pretty much anything you might need, at the chalet, and planned to make everything with minimal outside contact.

For Sam’s dinner I packed up frozen chicken in an insulated lunch cooler with ice packs (since I’m equally anal about food safety and there was no way I would pack chicken without it being cold). No wonder my pack was 28 pounds. I also had dehydrated pasta and rice as a side. I ate my typical quinoa with lentils and veggies. For dessert, the apple crisp made with dried apples and a yummy, toasted oatmeal mixture was a hit. And,  for a hot drink in the evening, which is common during coffee hour at the chalet, I made our own hot cocoa mix using 1 cup Carnation instant non-fat dried milk, 1 cup powdered sugar, and 1/2 cup Hershey’s cocoa. A few tablespoons in a mug with hot water and you have a terrific drink on any cold evening. In the morning, he had the GF Harvest apple cinnamon instant oatmeal for breakfast before we hit the trail heading down to The Loop. 

Once we got to Granite Park Chalet, I was still on alert, but not as worried as in the weeks beforehand. Sam washed his hands and was careful, even if I did get the eye rolls, which made it easier. I can’t say I’ll be less apprehensive on future trips because the reality is I will probably consider every possible scenario before venturing on any backcountry adventure, but hopefully with preparation and caution, we’ll simply be able to enjoy making good memories, not scary ones.

 

Opening Day at the Many Glacier Hotel

It’s cliche to ask where time went, yet here I am at the end of November recapping the summer since it was much more enjoyable to be on the trail rather than at the computer. But now is the time to recap a few of our favorite adventures.

For our mother/son excursion this year, John wanted to stay at the Many Glacier Hotel, and thankfully, I managed to reserve a room in January for their opening day on June 8. After the long, cold, snowy, horrible winter, I wasn’t sure what might be free of patches, or drifts, even in early June, but it was beginning to green with a few flowers blooming in the new warmth of the season.

It’s been years, long before the extensive renovations of the hotel, since I stayed there, and their fine work was obvious. Many Glacier isn’t fancy when you compare it to the modern hotels packed with technological amenities, but it’s very comfortable, clean, and is a perfect place to call home base anytime during the summer.  The staff was exceptionally sweet and accommodating, despite the long lines so early in the season, and we settled into our room with 2 twins at the end of the hallway on the second floor.

There were no epic hikes during this adventure. It was John’s trip so he chose what we did for the most part, and hoofing it for miles isn’t his idea of a good time. Eating the dining room was a big hit, and we ordered a huckleberry cobbler to enjoy on the dock of Swiftcurrent Lake later in the evening after a short stroll that was thwarted by the report of a young grizzly feeding in the willows a short ways down the Swiftcurrent Lake trail.

There were still a few snow drifts.
Huckleberry cobbler on the dock.

The next day we really hoped to take advantage of being there to play the tourist and go on a short horseback ride. Unfortunately, due to early season restrictions, the easy, 2 hour rides weren’t available, and I didn’t think John would be up for a half-day ride. (Especially since the horses are huge. Most, if not all of them, appear to be a draft-cross.)  

 

Instead, we hopped on the boat with the Glacier Park Boat Company during their first day of the season, and enjoyed the interpretive talk while basking in the gorgeous scenery. Even when a trip to Many Glacier doesn’t involve long hikes, there’s not a better place to be.

Sunset from the hotel.