Hike to the wildflower paradise of Preston Park

In the first week of August we decided to brave the Glacier National Park traffic to hike to Preston Park for the glorious wildflower display. An earlier attempt, pre-insanity traffic level, was thwarted due to avalanche danger at the end of June. It all worked out since the botanical display truly couldn’t have been better.

St. Mary Valley
St. Mary Valley

As I mentioned, the greatest challenge for this hike at this particular time of the year is finding a parking space at Siyeh Bend. The 11 of us left Great Falls around 5:40 a.m. heading to Valier, where we discovered the gas station (and subsequently the much-needed restroom) was closed until 7 a.m. Since there’s no way many of us could have made it to Browning, we found the campground along Lake Frances. It’s good to know there is a back-up.

My friend Rosanna met us along the way, and then we condensed bodies and backpacks in vehicles at the St. Mary Lodge before continuing to the trailhead. We made it to the trailhead shortly after 9 a.m. and it was already pretty tight. It’s a good thing we didn’t dawdle, or we would’ve had to go with a new plan.

It was a chilly start, but a lovely walk along the creek. Not long after making our way along the vegetation, we gradually climbed in elevation through the forest. Huckleberries lined the trail, although ripe ones were sparse since the peak was at least a couple of weeks away. We did find thimbleberries to snack upon along the way, though, so Sam was happy to finally be able to try them.

It was just over a mile before we reached the first junction where we could either head towards Siyeh and Piegan passes, or mosey back to Going-to-the-Sun Rd. We went left to continue through the forest and meadows brilliant with a crazy riot of wildflowers. Along the way, we also had a good view of Piegan Glacier. OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After just shy of another mile and a half, we reached the junction where we could go left for Piegan Pass (and ultimately Many Glacier), or veer right to Preston Park and Siyeh Pass. The kids were getting hungry by this time, but thankfully it wasn’t long before we reached a pond and stopped for lunch. It was a beautiful spot only sullied by the voracious horseflies that also thought it was a dandy place to be. They were vicious. John said he thought they would all look like they had chicken pox by the time we returned. After a brief lunch a few of the kids waded in the shallow, warm water trying (unsuccessfully) to avoid the biting menaces.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe allure of Siyeh Pass was too much for part of our group who decided to hike the .9 mile (one way) to the top. Once they headed off, our group finished playing around the pond, then decided to try to reach a snowfield. I called off our first attempt as it led us through thick brush since it was an ideal place for bears to be snoozing. So we continued down the trail a bit longer in search of an area where we could access a snowfield without risking life and limb from waking a grizzly.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

After crossing the creek by stepping from rock to rock and making a leap at the end, we walked to a nearby snowfield. It was a hot afternoon, and the boys were in heaven. Another couple joined us and asked me to take their photo at the edge of the snow before settling down for lunch. This was their mistake. Of course, if there is snow, there are snowball fights. John went to pelt Sam with one, and the unfortunate lady was positioned between John and his target. She caught the snowball upside her head. To say she was startled is an understatement, but thankfully she was gracious about the entire incident. John apologized profusely, and Sam even said he was sorry for his brother’s bad behavior. She said, “Who else can say they were hit in the head with a snowball in August in Glacier National Park?”OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Before long we saw the rest of our party returning from the saddle, so we reconvened at the creek before heading back down the trail. I think we finally reached our vehicles by 3:30 or so. We made good time even with spending longer to explore the saddle and snowfields.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI have to say that the area around the stream and snowfield is some of the most scenic areas in the park. Our friends who went to Siyeh Pass said the views didn’t get much better, although I’m sure if you continued up and over to the other side there would be a brand new gorgeous view. I absolutely adored the abundant wildflowers and beautiful landscape. Without a doubt, we’ll be back to Preston Park.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Please follow and like us:

2 Replies to “Hike to the wildflower paradise of Preston Park”

  1. Glacier National Park the crown of the continent. Excellent article on the heart of the park. Wildflowers, fresh air, snow in summer makes this heaven on earth. Makes this great place for family hike.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *